Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘#earlyeducators’

 

The Obama administration has just a released a new report that sums up its point with its title: “High-Quality Early Learning Settings Depend on a High-Quality Workforce: Low Compensation Undermines Quality.” It has been jointly released by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The report also features wage profiles for each state, including one for Massachusetts that’s posted here.

Wages are “sometimes at or near the Federal poverty line,” the report says, even when early educators “obtain credentials and higher levels of education.” It’s a deeply rooted problem that we blog about often, and one that other research reports have covered. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Micaela Bedell for Strategies for Children

Photo: Micaela Bedell for Strategies for Children

Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) has an exciting, new certificate program.

The Leadership in Early Education and Care program trains “students who are already working in early childhood centers” as directors, supervisors as well as students who aspire to be leaders.

“This innovative leadership certificate was designed to meet a known gap in degree options for the ECE field,” according to Charlene Mara, QCC’s Early Childhood Education Program coordinator.

The program’s classes are:

• Administration in Early Education and Care

• Supervision, Coaching and Mentoring in Early Childhood Settings

• Communication for Collaboration

• Advocacy and Ethics for Social Justice in Early Care and Education, and

• Seminar and Field Experience: Leadership in Early Education and Care

The courses are paid for by the Educator and Provider Support Grant, which is funded by the Department of Early Education and Care.

The first four program participants graduated last month. And another 20 or so additional students are expected to earn certificates during the 2016-2017 school year. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

DSC00281
My name is Denise Galford-Koeppel. I graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in Psychology, focused on developmental psychology. I wanted to understand the developing child first hand, so after I graduated I worked as an early childhood educator at the Wellesley Community Children’s Center (WCCC) while completing a master’s degree from Wheelock College.

I learned more about development and families from my mentors at WCCC than I did in school, and I have continued relationships with them to this day through roles there as a parent, board member, substitute teacher, and now consultant.

After teaching at WCCC, I worked in the lab of a national research study called the NICHD* Study of Early Child Care (Early Childhood Research Network) that looked at the effects of childcare on child development. There, I met young children who enjoyed the lab activities; and I was drawn to children who developed differently, the ones who did not stack blocks or who had difficulty interacting with a caregiver. This inspired me to become a developmental specialist in early intervention. I have loved that work since 1994. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Photo: Kate Samp for Strategies for Children

Looking for businesses that boost the economy? Consider early education and care programs. They’re part of Boston’s thriving small business community, but they face tough challenges. That’s the focus of a new article on WBUR’s Cognoscenti website written by Mayor Marty Walsh and Marie St. Fleur, president and CEO of the Bessie Tartt Wilson Initiative for Children.

It’s great when General Electric moves to town, but just as important, the article says, “was Melissa Phillips’s decision to open Little Brown Bear Academy in Roxbury. Phillips and her two assistants offer early education and care to 10 boys and girls, providing healthy meals and snacks, a robust learning curriculum and a nurturing environment. These services have a lasting impact by preparing children to succeed when they step foot into the classroom. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2016-05-16 at 12.30.01 PM

 

 

“There’s progress, but…”

That’s the theme of the new “The State of Preschool” 2015 Yearbook, published by NIEER (the National Institute for Early Education Research).

On NIEER’s Preschool Matters blog, in a post called “Slow and (Un)Steady Does Not Win the Race: What Other States Should Learn from New York,” W. Steven Barnett, NIEER’s director, shares his frustration with the troublingly slow pace of policy action. (We’ve added the bold face and underlining for emphasis.)

“The economist John Maynard Keynes famously wrote: ‘The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead.’ Typically, this phrase is cited to support government intervention over waiting for the eventually self-correcting private sector. As this year’s State of Preschool marks 14 years of tracking state government support for preschool education, I find myself citing Keynes in exasperation with the slow pace of government intervention. At the current rate, it will be another 50 years before states can reach all low-income children at age four, and it will take 150 years to reach 75 percent of all four-year-olds.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

SusanHi my name is Susan Norquist, and I am an education coach for the Little Sprouts Early Learning Center located in Brighton. I received my bachelor’s degree in counseling from Lyndon State College, and I am currently working on my master’s in education. I have worked for over 30 years in the social services field, half of those in early education.

I am currently enrolled in the Leadership Certificate Program offered by Quinsigamond Community College and Worcester State University. This program has been amazing. It has unleashed the leader in me and inspired me to share my passion for educating young children with others.

I can think of no other profession I would rather work in. Working with young children is a dream job. Where else can you walk into a room and get tons of hugs and unconditional love from charming, inquisitive children. As an education coach, I am able to work with teachers to enhance the development of their students. I assist them in setting goals for their students and for their own growth.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

GALA Winners

Tiffany Sheets, Sonia Gomez-Banrey, Marie St. Fleur, Flossy Calderon, Jennie Fitzkee, Abby Morales, Mary Lu Love, Melissa Russell, and Amy O’Leary

 

There was a happy crowd at last month’s annual Early Educators Gala — an evening of dinner, dancing, and awards that was emceed by our own Amy O’Leary, director of Strategies for Children’s Early Education for All Campaign.

“Early education and care is getting a lot of attention at the state and national level. We’re seeing new programs and more funding,” O’Leary said. “But at the heart of all we do are early educators who build nurturing relationships with young children. These relationships prepare children to be happy successful learners. It was an honor to help celebrate this work at the gala.”

“Early education professionals are the delivery system for the healthy development of young learners,” said Department of Early Education and Care Commissioner Tom Weber, who attended the celebration. “The gala was an inspiring celebration of passion and practice, showcasing the tremendous contributions that early educators are making every day to children, families and the Commonwealth.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

BethanyThis is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

My name is Bethany Whitemyer, and I’m the center director of the Bright Horizons in Pembroke. My center is located about 25 miles south of Boston and has programs for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and Kindergarten Prep. I’m proud to say that our center just received our third term of NAEYC accreditation this spring.

I started my career in early education and care as an Infant Teacher in 1992. I had recently graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, but I really loved working with children. I’ve also been a Lead Teacher, an Assistant Director, and a Field Director at Bright Horizons; as well as a Family Specialist at the Child Care Resource Center in Cambridge. I’ve used almost every employee benefit that Bright Horizons has to offer, including tuition reimbursement which I used when I went back to school for my master’s degree in Education at Lesley; the employee discount, which I used when my own children were younger; and the 401K, which I have been adding to for 20 years. (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

Brittany McGovernMy name is Brittany McGovern.

I have been working in the field of early education and care for half my life. During my first couple of years in the field, I was finishing high school. As a senior in high school, I was granted the opportunity to intern in the Head Start preschool classroom that was located in my school. The position turned into a year-long one, and this opportunity convinced me that I was destined to teach.

I recently switched places of employment, leaving a wonderful mom-and-pop childcare center that I love. I had seen this center when it was an unfinished shell of a building, and I’ve watched it grow into a fully constructed center with a waiting list for children who want to enroll.

I currently work in an infant/toddler classroom, where part of our funding comes from Early Head Start. The reason I had to change jobs was purely financial. I needed to earn more money.

What is important about my work is that I am able to provide a loving, safe environment in which children can play and, in turn, learn. This anonymous quote perhaps best expresses my passion for teaching: “One hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove, but the world may be different because I was important in the life of a child.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

This is one of a series of blogs featuring first-person accounts from early educators across Massachusetts.

*     *     *

TKMy name is Teddy Kokoros, and for the past 13 years I’ve had the pleasure of working as a preschool and pre-K teacher at the Transportation Children’s Center (TCC) in Boston. I first started working at TCC after completing my associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education at Bay State College’s now defunct Early Childhood Education program. Under the tutelage of my professor Linda Small, I got both the academic knowledge and the field experience via internships that I needed to be a competent early educator.

Initially, after completing my associate’s degree, I transferred to Wheelock College to continue my education but quickly had to drop out to work full-time when my family experienced financial and other hardships. I needed a full-time job to help out. Luckily, TCC, where I had completed an internship, was hiring and gave me a job as a preschool teacher. (more…)

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: