Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Election’ Category

“As soon as he took office in 1933, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt summoned the U.S. Congress to Washington for a three-month special session. Having promised to work quickly to lift the country out of the Great Depression, he pushed through 15 major initiatives, including the Emergency Banking Act, the Farm Credit Act, and the National Industrial Recovery Act. Looking back during a radio address in July, he called that period of frenzied legislative activity ‘the first 100 days.’

“This January, governors, mayors, and legislators will be sworn into office across the country. Child and family issues were front and center on the campaign trail, and many of them campaigned on a promise to expand early childhood education. We urge newly elected leaders in red and blue states alike to follow Roosevelt’s example by using their first 100 days in office to rapidly make good on that promise, and to support children and families with better child care opportunities by the time a new school year starts next fall.”

“When he ran for mayor of New York City in 2013, Bill de Blasio made universal prekindergarten the central issue of his campaign. The day he took office, on January 1, 2014, as a blizzard slowed the city to a crawl, de Blasio had Roosevelt’s first 100 days in mind. The people of New York had given him a mandate, but he knew he had to move quickly to make universal prekindergarten a reality. He dubbed the program ‘Pre-K for All’ and committed to having it ready at the beginning of the next school year, in September — a mere eight months away. In his first 100 days, he wanted to build an unstoppable momentum.”

“The First 100 Days: How Newly Elected Legislators Can Make Good on Early Education,” by Danila Crespin Zidovsky and Nonie Lesaux, New America Blog Post, December 7, 2022

Read Full Post »

we voted

The Election Day results from Massachusetts are in!

Congratulations to Governor-Elect Maura Healey, Lieutenant Governor-Elect Kim Driscoll, the returning members of the Massachusetts congressional delegation, and the winners of other statewide offices.

We are also excited to congratulate all returning and newly elected members of the Massachusetts Legislature.

What’s next?

Join us on Monday, November 21st, 2022, at 1 p.m. for a post-election webinar to discuss next steps and how we can work together to build relationships and engage elected officials in supporting early childhood in 2023!

Click here to register.

Read Full Post »

vote-blog

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

It’s Election Day! Please go out and vote!

Here are some useful voting facts and links:

• polls are open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. in Massachusetts. Click here to see where you vote

• you can also check the Secretary of State Elections Website

• you can see information about the Ballot Questions here

If you’ve already voted, thanks for your participation.

To learn more about voting, please check out Strategies for Children’s “Vote 2022” webpage. It has a number of voting resources as well as details on how we’re working to build more equitable access to early childhood programs.

Once again, please vote. 

Your participation matters to the future of children across Massachusetts.

Read Full Post »

49625395512_40dbede86a_c

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Advocates have long called for early education and care to be treated as a public good – just like public schools or the infrastructure of roads and bridges needed to maintain a 21st century workforce. We are grateful for the close collaboration and appreciate the decisions our elected officials have made to support and stabilize the early education and care sector over the last two pandemic years.

While the worst may be behind us, we’re not out of the woods yet. This election year is especially important as we move towards sustainability and growth.

So please be a Champion for Young Children! Here’s how:

As a Voter

• REGISTER: If you are new to voting in U.S. elections, you have recently moved to the state of Massachusetts, or you simply need to update your registration information, visit the Online Voter Registration System. The voter registration deadline is Saturday, October 29, 2022.

• Learn about with your district and elected officials. Every 10 years, districts for members of Congress, the State House of Representatives, the State Senate, and the Governor’s Council are re-drawn by the Legislature. This process happens after each federal census in order to make sure each district is made up of approximately the same number of people. Learn more about redistricting in Massachusetts here.

• Learn about the candidates. Click here for the full list of state election candidates.

• Engage Candidates and Community: Ask questions about their education platforms and/or write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper urging candidates to prioritize young children in the election. If you need assistance, contact Marisa FearStrategies for Children’s associate director of research and policy.

• VOTE on (or before) Tuesday, November 8th! Click here for early voting information and instructions on how to vote by mail. Plan ahead for in person voting by looking up your poll place and election information.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

 

It’s Election Day!

If you haven’t already, be sure to vote!

Read Full Post »

 

The results of a new poll from the First Five Years Fund are in:

“The Coronavirus pandemic has opened voters’ eyes to the importance of child care for families—and the economy. Now voters are ready for sweeping federal action,” the Fund explains on its poll fact sheet.

Among the poll’s findings:

• 84% of American voters say high-quality, affordable child care for families with young children is an essential service — just like healthcare and education

• 79% of voters say that the pandemic has made it clear to them how essential a strong child care system is for families who need it, and

• 77% of voters say that public funding for children’s education and care should start before kindergarten

“No longer can lawmakers and candidates for office view child care as a “nice-to-have” service, when voters now clearly see it as something that is essential for children, families, and America’s economy.”

Child care also has bipartisan appeal: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode for Strategies for Children

“While early education was certainly not the main story coming out of Tuesday’s election, a handful of cities and states cast votes that could have a significant impact on the future of education access for young children,” Aaron Loewenberg writes on New America’s EdCentral blog.

And in its weekly news roundup, NIEER (the National Institute for Early Education Research) reports that voters gave both a thumbs-up to some proposals, and a thumbs-down to others.

In two cases, voters rejected tax increases:

“In Missouri more than 60% of voters rejected a proposed increase in the cigarette tax to expand early childhood education beyond the current 3% of Missouri 4-year-olds enrolled in state-funded pre-K,” NIEER notes. “In Oregon, roughly 60% opposed Measure 97 to increase specific corporation taxes to boost funding for public early education, K-12, healthcare and senior services.”

But Cincinnati said yes to a tax hike.

“…by a margin of 62 percent to 32 percent, voters approved a property tax increase expected to raise $48 million a year for five years. Of the $48 million, $15 million will go towards the Preschool Promise initiative, which advocates claim will enable 6,000 students (about 80 percent of three- and four-year-olds) to access pre-K each year over the next five years,” New America says. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Photo: Alessandra Hartkopf for Strategies for Children

Tired of the election’s noise and name-calling?

Then encourage candidates and already-elected officials to talk about early education.

As a U.S. News and World Report article explains, “Education is an issue that serves as a linchpin for many of the other issue concerns of voters, such as job security, economic opportunity, wage stagnation and economic mobility. Helping families and communities provide children with high-quality early education from birth to age five has emerged as a family issue which the vast majority of Democrats, Republicans and independents can agree upon and urge action.”

The article — “Early Education Makes for Good Politics: In an ugly campaign season, investments in early childhood education are good policy with bipartisan appeal” – was co-written by a bipartisan team. Jim Messina is the founder and CEO of the Messina Group, and he was the campaign manager for President Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign. Kevin Madden is a partner at Hamilton Place Strategies, and he was a senior advisor and spokesperson for Governor Mitt Romney’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Get Ready for Super Tuesday

Tomorrow is Super Tuesday – the biggest single day for presidential candidates to win delegates. Voters will go to the polls in one U.S. territory and 12 states, including Massachusetts.

So please vote! Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

 For more information, please contact Laura Healy, Research and Field Associate, at 617-330-7389 or at lhealy@earlyeducationforall.org.

Read Full Post »

“Americans on both sides of the aisle have come to realize the promise of early education; polls indicate that improving pre-K and child care access has strong bipartisan support. Yet meaningful talk of early education has been somewhat absent from the 2016 Presidential debates, particularly on the Republican side. We hope the momentum of the last few years continues into this election cycle so that more progress is made to ensure that all young children have access to the early education programs they need to prepare them for kindergarten and beyond.”

“What Candidates Should be Talking about in 2016: Six Ideas from New America,” New America’s EdCentral Blog, January 6, 2016

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: