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”New reports from two government agencies suggest that the child care system is failing families, and not just during the pandemic.

”According to data from a Census Bureau survey, the pandemic introduced strains that caused 3 in 10 adults with young children — 6.6 million total adults — to remove kids from child care this summer.

A Treasury Department report released Wednesday states that 1 out of 6 dollars in family income goes to pay for child care, which is more than the average family spends on groceries and close to double what the government calls affordable.

“ ‘The free market works well in many different sectors, but child care is not one of them,’ Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said at a news conference Wednesday.”

”New government reports paint child care system as ‘unworkable,’ ” by Joe Murphy, NBC News, September 16, 2021

“Compared with K through 12 students, preschoolers are suspended at nearly 3 times the frequency of older students,” Molly Kaplan, the host of the ACLU’s At Liberty podcast, explains in a recent episode called, “How To End the Preschool to Prison Pipeline.”

The episode focuses on the racial and social inequities that even very young children must face.

To explore the issue, Kaplan interviews Rosemarie Allen, a School of Education professor at the State University of Denver.

As Allen’s faculty webpage explains, “Her life’s work is centered on ensuring children have access to high quality early childhood programs that are developmentally and culturally appropriate… Her classes are focused on ensuring teachers are aware of how issues of equity, privilege, and power impact teaching practices.”

On the podcast, Allen describes the cascade of expulsions that young children can face.

“We’re finding that children as young as eight months old began to be suspended and expelled from their child care programs, usually for doing typical things that babies do, like crying or biting,” she says.

Continue Reading »


 
Tune in today at 1 p.m. to watch this school year’s first meeting of the Board of the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC).

The meeting will cover a number of topics, including an update on EEC’s distribution of federal ARPA Child Care Stabilization Grants.

Now is a great time to catch up with the Board’s discussion of these important policy issues.

Last week at an emergency meeting, the Board voted to give Commissioner Samantha Aigner-Treworgy the authority to modify workforce regulations to help alleviate the ongoing workforce shortage.

Today the Board will hear EEC’s initial plan for these workforce modifications – a hot topic for the early childhood field. Continue Reading »

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Photo: nappy from Pexels

There’s a new child care survey for Massachusetts parents.

So please ask the parents in your programs to fill it out. It should take less than five minutes.

“Help us to identify what is most important to you as a parent/guardian of 0-5 year old child(ren),” the survey says.  “We will use this information to guide expansion of child care supports.”

As we’ve blogged (here and here), gathering data from families is a crucial step in developing successful child care policies.

The survey is the result of a partnership between the Boston Public School’s Department of Early Childhood; the City of Boston’s Economic Mobility Lab — a team of social entrepreneurs who work in the Mayor’s Office of Policy to “advance the upward economic mobility of Bostonians;” and the Boston Opportunity Agenda, which is part of StriveTogether, “a national network of local communities striving to achieve racial equity and economic mobility.” Continue Reading »

Going on vacation

beach

Photo: Alyssa Haywoode

 

The blog is going on vacation. See you in September!

Vanessa Pashkoff

Vanessa Pashkoff

Vanessa Pashkoff spent time in high school and college working as a nanny. And she was always inspired by “the spark of children and wonder,” she says. But as a student in McMaster University, in Canada, where she’s from, she earned a degree in political science. 

“I was convinced I was going to be a social worker.” 

A friend, however, was going to teach in Korea, and that inspired Pashkoff to look into teaching abroad. She applied to a program, got accepted, took a crash course in teaching English as a second language and spent a year teaching a preschool class in Japan. 

“I lived in Kobe,” Pashkoff recalls, “and I loved it. It was amazing to help people learn and to see another environment and the cultural differences. It really was what I was looking for without knowing it.” 

“I created some incredible relationships with families, and I am still in touch with them to this day.” 

While she was in Japan, Pashkoff decided to apply to Brock University in Ontario, Canada, so she could earn a degree in education. 

“It was the kind of thing where everyone else seemed to know that I was going to end up being an educator or a teacher, and I just never wanted to admit it,” she says.  Continue Reading »

Elliot Haspel, a former fourth grade teacher and policy expert, is calling for “a new form of local infrastructure,” the “early childhood district.”

These districts would create an easy way for parents to understand what – and where — their early education and care options are.

Haspel explains his take on this approach in a new white paper posted on the policy website Capita:

“Child care is not yet a right, and it lacks this kind of easily recognized governmental entity to oversee and provide services. If Kindergarten finds you, child care requires you to find it hidden within a deep, dark forest.”

“In a sentence: Early childhood districts are like school districts but for children five and under.”

This kind of local governance of early education is a concept that Strategies for Children explored in 2019, when we released the policy brief, “Local Governance for Early Childhood: Lessons from Leading States.” We pointed to North Carolina as a good example. Continue Reading »

“Andrea Wagner, the chief technical officer from Berkshires Sterile Manufacturing in Lee, encouraged other biotech companies to consider a move to Western Massachusetts.

“ ‘There is a huge need for sustainable jobs out here,” she said. “Although we do have trouble finding talent similar to you, the cost of living is lower (and) the educational structure here is similar, if not better than Boston.’ 

“She added, though, that a lack of childcare has been a major issue for employees. The company tried to solve this issue by giving space in its facility to a nonprofit daycare in exchange for discounted daycare for employees, but the daycare has been short-staffed and partially closed since the pandemic began.”

 

— “Massachusetts vaccine makers cite talent pipeline, childcare as biggest barriers to recruitment,” by Amy Sokolow, The Boston Herald, July 27, 2021

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Photo: mentatdgt from Pexels

Now is the time — as we’ve blogged here and here — to apply for the Child Care Stabilization Grants that will be distributed by the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC).

Here are a number of resources that can help as you apply for this noncompetitive grant.

NEW! Strategies for Children will host two information sessions TOMORROW. Here’s the registration information:

Wednesday, August 11: 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Ju7XaNRgQMOm1z1xZtEt2g

Wednesday, August 11: 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. (with Spanish interpretation)
https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_X6nwmqzVREicD1aJ5nGeeg

Strategies has also created an EEC Child Care Stabilization Grant Information Page on its website where you can find:

• SFC’s Guide to the Grant information sheets for GSA and FCC providers

• Google forms to collect questions and feedback for EEC

• upcoming information sessions and provider panels — as well as recordings of previous events, and

• additional application resources from EEC

EEC Resources

EEC Child Care Stabilization Grant: EEC’s grant information page has a number of useful resources, including:

GSA Application PDF

FCC Application PDF

User Guide

Video Library, and the

C3 Formula Calculator

For even more help with the application contact the ARPA Child Care Stabilization Grants Help Desk Support at 833-600-2074.

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